Estrogen Positive Breast Cancer

by Dawn

I had estrogen positive breast cancer in 1997. I had a lumpectomy and underwent both chemo and radiation. I took tamoxifan for the 5 years and have been blessed to be cancer free since. Having been estrogen positive I was advised to avoid soy, yet I've always read how healthy it is for you. But to be safe, I have since not had any. In all these years I have been confused--can I or can I not have soy? We are thinking about trying a vegan diet but reading how soy is a substantial staple in it I need to know how it will affect me. Thank you.


I am so happy to hear you've been cancer free. The soy debate is truly confusing, so you are right to be unsure as to which path to take.I am not a doctor so I cannot advise you on the best diet to remain cancer-free.

However, I can say that there is an abundance of food in the vegan world that is completely soy-free. People ask me this question a lot, and I always tell them that I personally do not eat much soy. It's not necessarily a conscious decision to avoid it, it's just that there are so many other options that I don't really come across that much soy.

Instead of soybeans, I eat kidney beans, black beans, chickpeas, lentils, cannellini beans, split peas, and any other bean that looks good at the grocery store. Instead of soy milk, you can drink almond milk, hemp milk, hazelnut milk, rice milk, or coconut milk. You can also use any of those in baking. You can add flavor to your dishes with spices and salt rather than soy sauce.

The reality is that people who eat non-vegan processed food diets end up eating more soy than someone who eats a healthy, balanced, whole foods-based vegan diet. Soybean oil is used to fry tons of foods, and soy protein isolate is used as a stabilizer in many of those processed foods. When you are eating real foods, you can easily avoid those soy particulates, which I believe are the real issues. Whole soy products like tempeh and miso are likely not to lead to any problems.

To be safe, you can just be a vegan and avoid soy, if that's what you think is best for your health.

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May 18, 2011
Soy & estrogen
by: LyNel

Hello, I too am a breast cancer survivor of 17 years. I was told it was an estrogen caused cancer & put on Tamoxifin. I was told it would be a life time drug because I manage to make so much of it. Then I was told to stop taking it. I choose to take it anyway. I still take it. I did get hives from it & grew a goiter. I eat soy all the time & don't think it causes estrogen production or increases. The research I've read doesn't support that at all.

I have not become old looking early or anything else associated with premature aging because of taking Tamoxifin. I'm 69 now. I am completely pain & arthritis free. I have endless energy. I am so healthy my doctor tells me that she wishes her blood tests came back that good. I can still see distances without glasses or anything else. My mind is sharp & don't have much of a memory problem. The 37 treatments of radiation did kill my hair everywhere. I have to wear a wig. I think if your research the whole soy thing you would be very surprised. Just be sure any soy you do injest is non GMO. I have been vegan for almost a year. Best of luck to you.

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by Cathleen Woods   |   © Copyright 2008-2016   |

Disclaimer: Everything in this website is based upon information collected by Cathleen Woods, from a variety of sources. It is my opinion and is not intended as medical advice.
It is recommended that you consult with a qualified health care professional before making a diet change.